Visa for South Korea - Digital Nomad + Remote Worker - Guide 2022

Visa for South Korea - Digital Nomad + Remote Worker - Guide 2022

South Korea is one of the most popular destinations in the world. It is also one of the safest countries for tourists.
To remain compliant, any organizations wishing to hire workers in South Korea must sponsor their work visas. South Korea, on the other hand, has numerous temporary visa kinds as well as at least eight different work permit categories based on the sort of skilled worker that can apply when you are a remote worker or a digital nomad in Korea.
This complication can make it more difficult for remote workers or digital nomads to determine which visas their employees require and how to obtain them, so we created a full guide to help to choose the right visa.

Which visa to do remote work in South Korea?

South Korea, has substantial stamp-on-entry visa-free possibilities, most digital nomads from Western nations will work on a tourist visa.

If you want to stay in Seoul for an extended period of time, you should check into additional visa possibilities. For sustained remote work in Korea, a business visa such as D-7, D-8 or D-9 is usually the one recommended.

Another solution for digital nomads is to use the self-employment visa to encourage overseas entrepreneurs to set up their businesses in the country. The sort of visa you will apply for, like with traditional work visas, is determined by your job industry. The D-8-4 technology and business start-up visa, for example, is intended to accommodate potential companies in the nation and therefore is perfect for digital nomads.

Is there a visa for digital nomads in Korea?

The South Korean government declared its plan to introduce a digital nomad visa scheme at the end of March 2021. This type of visa will allow international IT specialists and other remote employees to live and work in Korea even if they are not employed by Korean firms.
The visa will be valid for a long time. Please keep in mind that the Korean immigration authorities will do extensive due diligence on the overseas employer. They want to make certain that this chance is not abused.

The new visa, which will be offered even to applicants who do not work for South Korean firms, would allow them to stay in the nation while working remotely, which is a rising worldwide practice.

What visa do I need as a digital nomad in Korea?

If you are not a Korean citizen, you need to have a work visa to work in Korea. This visa is called the “Work Permit” (회원가입 활동관리형지). You need to apply for this visa before you come to Korea. The Work Permit is not a tourist visa. You can only use the Work Permit for your work in Korea. You can apply for a Work Permit at the immigration office in your home country. You can also apply for the Work Permit at the immigration office in Korea.

The Work Permit is a visa that allows you to work in Korea. It is a type of work visa that is used for foreigners. You can only use the Work Permit to work in Korea. You cannot use it for tourism, for study, or for other purposes.

Can I live in South Korea without a visa?

Yes, you can live in South Korea without a visa. As a foreigner, you are allowed to enter South Korea without a visa. The only exception is if you are a citizen of a country that is listed in the list of countries that require a visa to enter South Korea.
You can get a visa at the airport if you are flying into South Korea. If you are arriving by train or bus, you can get a visa at a South Korean consulate or embassy.

Why are Korean visas denied?

If you have been denied a visa to Korea, you might be wondering why you have been denied a visa. The answer is simple: you have been denied a visa because you have a criminal record.

The Korean government is very strict about who they allow into their country. They have a list of things that they will not allow into their country.

How much bank balance is required for a South Korea visa?

If you have a decent amount of money, you can apply for a visa. However, it is not as easy as it seems. You need to be prepared with the right documents to get the visa.

A South Korea visa is the official document that you need to get a visa to visit the country. You need to get a visa if you are a tourist, student, business person or a worker. The South Korea visa is one of the most important documents that you need to get when you visit a country. It is a document that tells the embassy about your identity and your purpose of visiting the country. It is mandatory for you to apply for the visa if you want to visit South Korea. If you are a foreigner, you need to apply for the visa. You will have to pay the visa fee to get the visa. The amount of money that you need to pay depends on the type of visa that you need to apply.

Is it hard to get a visa to South Korea?

It’s pretty straightforward to get a visa to South Korea, you just need to fill out an online application form and submit it to the South Korean embassy or consulate in your country. They’ll take a look at it and send you a confirmation. You’ll need to pay a visa fee of about US$40 (or €35 or £30). The visa costs will depend on your nationality, the purpose of your visit, and whether you’re a tourist or business traveler.

Is South Korea issuing work visas?

South Korea is one of the countries that issue work visas. The South Korean government issues work visas for people to work in the country. The visa is issued to people who want to work in South Korea and are not citizens of the country. The visa is issued for a period of up to one year.

There are many reasons why South Korea issues work visas. One of the reasons is that South Korea wants to keep its population stable. South Korea is a country with a rapidly growing population. The country’s population is growing at a rate of more than one percent per year. The country’s population is expected to reach almost 100 million by 2025. The country’s population is expected to continue to grow.
The government of South Korea wants to keep its population stable. The government issues work visas to people who want to work in the country. The visa is issued for a period of up to one year. The government of South Korea also issues work visas to people who want to work in the country.

How long can you stay in Korea with a visa?

The length of your stay depends on your visa type and your purpose of stay, for example, the tourist visa is a temporary visa and you can stay in Korea for up to 60 days. You can apply for a tourist visa at the immigration office in the country you are entering.

The visa is valid for 60 days from the date of entry so you can stay in Korea for 60 days and you can leave Korea for 60 days.

How can I get h1b visa in Korea?

The answer is simple. You have to apply for it and then wait for the processing time. The visa is valid for 1 year. You have to apply for the visa before you enter Korea. The visa can be applied at the Korea embassy or consulate in your home country. You can apply for the visa online or in person. You can apply for the visa online by visiting the Korea Embassy or Consulate website.

You can apply for the visa in person at the Korea Embassy or Consulate in your home country.
The visa processing time depends on the country where you are applying for the visa. The processing time for the visa is usually 3 to 6 weeks. You can apply for the visa in Korea at the Korea Immigration Service (KIS) website.

What are the most appropriate VISA for Digital Nomads and remote workers in Korea?

The appropriate VISA for a Digital Nomad or remote worker in Korea really depends on your situation, but we compiled a list of the ones that are the most suitable. However, you should always check the latest information on the Korean official website for VISAs.

Short Term Visit

Korea Visa Type for Short Term Visit Purpose
Visa Exempted (B-1) Citizen of a country covered by a Visa Exemption Agreement with the Republic of Korea who intends to participate in activities covered by the agreement
Tourist / Transit (General) (B-2-1) Persons who intend to visit Korea for tour or transit without a visa
Tourist / Transit (Jeju) (B-2-2) Individuals who plan to visit Jeju Island for a trip or transit within 30 days will be eligible to enter Korea without a visa.
Short-Term General (C-3-1) A person who intends to stay for a short period of time to visit relatives, invest in public business, participate in non-official sports games, attend events or meetings, perform cultural art, engage in training, take lessons, attend a religious ceremony, collect documents for academic research, or any other equivalent activities.
Group Tourist (C-3-2) A individual or group who intends to visit Korea for leisure or small-scale cross-border trade, as guaranteed by the applicant’s travel agency.
Business Visitor (General) (C-3-4) A person who intends to engage in commercial activities like as market research, business meetings, consultancy, contract signing, or small-scale international trading, or an APEC card holder, who is visiting Korea without a visa.
Business Visitor (Agreement) (C-3-5) A person who intends to join ROK for short-term business under an arrangement with ROK.
Business Visitor (Sponsored) (C-3-6) A person who has been invited by a corporation or organization classified as a preferential company by the ROK Minister of Justice.
Short term Visitor (Overseas Korean) (C-3-8) An overseas Korean having a foreign nationality who is under the age of 60 as specified by the Act on the Immigration and Legal Status of Overseas Koreans.
Ordinary Tourist (C-3-9) A person who intends to visit Korea for vacation or leisure purposes.
Working Holiday (H-1) Citizen of a country that has signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) or other arrangement about the Working Holidays policy and intends to work in Korea for a short period of time to cover travel expenditures.

Professional

Korea Visa Type for Professional Purpose
Short-Term Employee (C-4) A person who intends to visit for a short-term job such as a temporary exhibition, advertising modeling, lecturing, speaking, research, technological consulting, and so on.
Job Seeker (D-10-1) A person who intends to train or work in a field that qualifies for a Professor, Foreign Language Instructor, Research, Technical Instructor/Technician, Professional, Artist/Athlete, or Foreign National of Special Ability visa.
Business Startup (D-10-2) A person qualifying in item C of D-8 Corporate Investment who intends to launch a start-up business.
Technical Instructor / Technician (E-4) A person who intends to provide professional knowledge in natural science or technology advise related to an industrially unique field upon invitation from a Korean public or private institute in the Republic of Korea.
Professional (E-5) A person holding a national certificate under the laws of the Republic of Korea, such as a foreign lawyer, certified public accountant, doctor, and so on, who intends to engage in professional employment in the legal, accounting, medical, and other sectors stipulated by the laws of the Republic of Korea.
Independent Professional (by FTA) (E-7-91) A person who is not affiliated with any foreign firm and intends to provide technology advice or to be independently employed by a Korean corporation or an individual in accordance with an FTA.
Special talent (F-5-11) A person who has been acknowledged by the Minister of Justice for distinction in a particular field, such as science, management, education, cultural arts, or athletics.

Work and Visit

Korea Visa Type for Work and Visit Purpose
Work and Visit (Family Connection) (H-2-1) Overseas Koreans aged 25 and up who have a foreign nationality and a family tie
Work and Visit (Parents/Spouse of D-2 Student) (H-2-2) Overseas Korean aged 25 or older with foreign nationality under the Act on Immigration and Legal Status of Overseas Korean who is invited by his/her kid or spouse who is currently enrolled in ROK for at least a semester with the D-2 visa
Work and Visit (Expired visa) (H-2-7) Overseas Koreans aged 25 or older with foreign nationality in accordance with the Act on Immigration and Legal Status of Overseas Koreans who are 60 years or younger at the time of complete departure from the Republic of Korea following the expiration of the visa (H-2)

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